HELLO! I’m Mike, also known as MetMan. In addition to writing about climate change and my experience in meteorology and atmospheric sciences, I am presenting some information on meteorology and climate through my website. I spent nearly 11 years working in DOD meteorology and atmospheric sciences before life events led to a different path in government accounting/finance and database/application development (mostly client server programming and some ASP web). I now enjoy writing about climate and climate change, following and monitoring weather events and issuing weather forecasts (they can be found in my ‘Weather Forecasts’ page) for selected clients, including for members of the Atlanta Braves baseball forum , and watching Atlanta Braves baseball and Penn State and Dallas Cowboys football. I also enjoy local high school football. 
 
Much of the following information can also be seen in much greater detail on ‘Mike’s Meteorology Page’.
 
I am a retired meteorologist, a former NOAA-National Weather Service employee, and a former employee of the DOD’s U.S. Army Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory where I was an associate RDT&E meteorologist at White Sands Missile Range, NM, Poker Flat Research Range, AK, and eventually the Chief Operational and Research Meteorologist at Yuma Proving Ground, AZ. As a NOAA employee, I was a certified NOAA-NWS Weather Radar Operator, Weather Observer, Weather Forecaster, and Climate Data Analyst. I was also a certified DOD weather forecaster specializing in operational, environmental, and ballistic weather forecasting, military meteorology, planetary boundary layer, aeronomy (middle and upper atmospheric research), and meteorological research and project support (RDT&E).
 
I have operational, classroom, and analytical experience in wide array or meteorological functions from taking a simple surface observation to collaborating with peers and evaluating and assimilating atmospheric data for use in technical research papers (gray literature). I have collaborated with other non-DOD scientists on DOD supported research projects and have contributed to the preparation and compilation of official meteorological government technical reports and documentation of official DOD meteorological and atmospheric science projects and missions. I have comprehensive analytical, functional, and operational meteorological skills. I have done meteorological research, operational meteorological project support, various types of weather forecasting, and extensive meteorological data analysis. What really make my experience unique is the actual involvement in all phases of meteorological functions from the setup, calibration, operation, and maintenance of meteorological instruments, applied field experience in surface and upper air observations, and diverse data collection to multiple types of weather forecasting enabling involvement in almost all spacial scales of meteorology; synoptic, mesoscale, and microscale (including boundary layer).
 
I have more than a decade work experience in meteorology and atmospheric sciences and nearly 3000 hours of formal classroom instruction with initial educational emphasis on “Applied Meteorology” and subsequently advanced integrated research related “Atmospheric Sciences”. “Applied Meteorology” involves extensive coursework in meteorology, physics, and mathematics, as well as direct experience in applying basic and theoretical concepts to real world situations. DOD Applied Meteorologists apply weather and climate information to the unique problems facing our military forces.
 
I’ve recently been asked by Dr. Karl Svozil, a noted theoretical physicist, to coauthor a paper on climate change. Although I declined for numerous reasons, I was honored to be asked by such an accomplished educator and researcher.
 
I hope you enjoy my page! Please feel free to email me with any questions and comments.
 
Mike


 
Significant Awards:
  • Letter of Commendation, DNA ICECAP Program
  • Letter of Commendation, Air Force Avionics Lab, Project 2004-01-12
  • Superior Performance Quality Pay Increase
  • Letter of Outstanding Performance, U.S. Army Missile Command
  • Plus many other Letters of Appreciation, Special Act, and Performance Awards.
Agencies worked for and/or supported:
  • DOD (Department of Defense), U.S. Army Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory
  • Note: The U.S. Army Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory (ASL) is now part of the Environmental Sciences Division of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (established October 1992) http://www.arl.army.mil/www/default.cfm?page=188
  • DNA (Defense Nuclear Agency)
  • DOE (Department of Energy)
  • Dept. of Commerce, NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), National Weather Service (NWS) 
  • DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) http://www.darpa.mil/our_work/
  • UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research) / NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research)
  • Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories
  • Air Force Geophysics Laboratory
  • NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration)
  • Various universities doing atmospheric research (Utah State Logan Space Science Lab is one I remember)
  • Various private corporations (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab, Sandia, GCA Corp Bedford MA GCA Technology Div, Mission Research Corp Santa Barbara CA and many more)
Meteorology Certifications (testing and/or performance based):
  • Artillery Ballistic Meteorology DOD
  • Environmental and Operational Weather Forecasting Weather Forecasting DOD, NOAA/NWS
  • Micrometeorology/Boundary Layer Meteorology DOD
  • Meteorological Instrumentation DOD, NOAA/NWS
  • Surface Weather Observations DOD, NOAA/NWS
  • Upper Air Weather Observations (PIBAL/Radiosonde/Rawinsonde) DOD
  • Meteorological Rockets (Rocketsondes) DOD
  • Weather Radars (T9, WSR74C) DOD, NOAA/NWS

 

DOD RDT&E Meteorological Activities, Projects, and Positions

Notable DOD RDT&E Meteorological Activities, Projects, and Positions:
Note: Most DOD research is produced as “gray” literature or for a specific local use and is generally focused and applicable for DOD purposes only but may be adaptable for civilian use as well. DOD research relating to meteorology, climate, and atmospheric research may be documented and found at the Defense Technical Research Center. Selected research may be submitted for publishing in scientific journals, books, or other print media.
 
Lead Research Meteorologist, Desert Macroscale Meteorology, Influences of the North American Monsoon on the Arizona Desert Environment, Yuma Proving Ground, AZ, 1978
Research Meteorologist, Desert Mesoscale Meteorology, Effects of Positive Vorticity Advection (PVA) On Desert Convective Activity during the North American Monsoon, Yuma Proving Ground, AZ 1978
Note: Positive Vorticity Advection (PVA) is now more commonly known as Cyclonic Vorticity Advection (CVA)
Chief Operational and Research Meteorologist, Meteorology, Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) Chief Meteorologist providing an array of meteorological functions including operational, environmental, ballistic, and tactical weather forecasting services including air blast, upper air winds, and meteorological research and other support services, Yuma Proving Ground, AZ, 1977-1978
Lead Research Meteorologist, Desert Microscale Meteorology, Desert Solar Radiation Review and Analysis, Yuma Proving Ground, AZ, 1977-1978
Associate RDT&E Meteorologist, RDT&E Meteorology, Meteorological support for testing of the Global Positioning System (GPS), Yuma Proving Ground, AZ, 1977
Research Meteorologist, Climatology, Desert Environmental Handbook (contributing), Yuma Proving Ground, AZ, 1977
Associate RDT&E Meteorologist, Boundary Layer support for the High Energy Laser (HEL), Redstone Arsenal, AL, 1974-1976
Associate Research Meteorologist, Statistical Climatology, Climate and Atmospheric Research, U.S. Army Missile Command Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Redstone Arsenal, AL, 1975
Associate RDT&E Meteorologist, RDT&E, Atmospheric Science/Aeronomy, ICECAP 74 (Infrared Chemistry Experiments – Coordinated Auroral Program), Aeronomy, Auroral Studies, University of Alaska-Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, Poker Flat Research Range, AK, 1974

LWIR (7-24-Micrometer) Measurements from the Launch of a Rocketborne Spectrometer into a Quiet Atmosphere, 1974

High Altitude Effects Simulation-HAES, 1974

Measurement of Winds in the Thermosphere, 1974

Rocket-Borne Spectral Measurement of Atmospheric Infrared Emission during a Quiet Condition in the Auroral Zone-HAES, 1974

Associate RDT&E Meteorologist, RDT&E, Atmospheric Science/Aeronomy, Meteorological Rocket Network (MRN), Poker Flat Research Range, AK, 1973-1974 
Associate RDT&E Meteorologist, RDT&E, Atmospheric Science/Aeronomy, ICECAP 73 (Infrared Chemistry Experiments – Coordinated Auroral Program), Aeronomy, Auroral Studies, University of Alaska-Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, Poker Flat Research Range, AK, 1973

LWIR (7-24-Micrometer) Measurements from the Launch of a Rocketborne Spectrometer into a Quiet Atmosphere, 1973

High Altitude Effects Simulation-HAES, 1973

Measurement of Winds in the Thermosphere, 1973 

Associate RDT&E Meteorologist, RDT&E, Atmospheric Science/Aeronomy, Noctilucent Cloud Research, Poker Flat Research Range, AK, 1973
Associate RDT&E Meteorologist, RDT&E Meteorology, 1976 VIKING MARS LANDER PROJECT, White Sands Missile Range, NM, 1972
Associate RDT&E Meteorologist, RDT&E Meteorology, NAVSTAR GPS Project, White Sands Missile Range, NM, 1972 
Associate RDT&E Meteorologist, RDT&E Meteorology, Athena and Pershing Missile test launches, White Sands Missile Range, NM, 1972

Associate RDT&E Meteorologist, Atmospheric Research Meteorology, Ballistic Wind and Density Studies, White Sands Missile Range, NM, 1972

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